Titanic: A success story?

We all have heard stories about the most famous ship of all times, its construction, luxury and tragedy. The most famous out of three sister-ships (Olympic, Titanic & Britannic); but there is much more to tell. Its engineers, designers and communicators were the ones in responsible for making their product reach headlines everywhere. There have been many ships even more luxurious than the Titanic… so what makes it so spacial?

The design of a titan

Thomas Henry Ismay was the founder of Oceanic Steam Navigation Company which would later to change its name to White Star Line. Back in the day, liners were ships designed to move people cross-continents, and cruises were not much a thing. With White Star Line and Cunard Line as main competitors in the early 1900’s, both shared similar services, transporting people from one land to another. Cunard Line had just commissioned Lusitania and Mauretania prior to Titanic, but Mr. Ismay had other plans in mind, knowing there was not much difference for the passengers between the two companies, he decided to jump to the “over the top luxury” industry and create customer-experience designed liners with Thomas Andrews (British naval architect) as the head that designed the magic.

Design of the “ship of dreams”

Mr. Andrews knew he needed to go over the top and design “The largest moving object of all times” (at the time). On the next chart, we can compare the Titanic’s first class facilities with its two main competitors (also first class facilities).

FacilitiesR.M.S. TitanicR.M.S. LusitaniaR.M.S. Mauretania
Verandah Café
Smoking Room
Reading and
Writing Room
Lounge
Reception Room
Café Parisien
Gymnasium
Turkish Bath
Swimming Pool
Barber Shop
Squash Court
Children’s Room
Library

“The ship is as nearly perfect as human brains can make her”

-Thomas Andrews

Unsinkable ship?

We all know the faith faced our favourite titan, but why was it called “unsinkable”? Well, believe it or not Titanic surpassed the safety requirements at the time. Its luxury and attention to detail brought famous and wealthy customers, but the tragedy immortalized the ship due to its loss. Bruce Ismay was not satisfied just being the biggest and the most expensive, he wanted to be also the fastest one; at the end, it did not matter how rich or how famous the person was, all 1,500 victims had the same fate.

Not meeting your brand promise creates legends?

In this case, YES! But WSL had serious trouble after its titan sank on its very first voyage; we all know it was an accident, but it is critical for customers to get the result expected. Though it was an amazing engineering design, it failed to complete their first brand promise which was partially the reason such wealthy people bought a ticket in the first place, a side from being the most luxurious ship. Though Titanic’s investors received $5,000,000.00 on “total loss of the steamer” from Ocean Stream Navigation Company Limited.

Needless to say WSL had lots of protests outside their corporate offices in Liverpool and basically went bankrupt after until they merged with their competitor Cunard Line.

A compassionate Canadian

One of the most challenging (and least known) following the tragedy was the recognition and burial of bodies. John Henry Barnstead was Canadian public servant that created the best forensic system, the Barnstead method; “Identification, numbering and effects”. Each body would be enumerated with a list of effects that will always stay with the body along with its belongings.

He was truly a critical person for all Titanic’s family victims, he showed a huge compassion achieving an error-proof system where if the body was at a high level of decomposition (not suitable for return) their belongings would reach their families. His method is still used today.

Yours truly, Monsieur Marketing.

References:

A. (2011, March 27). Saloon (first class) accommodations. Retrieved March 25, 2021, from https://www.rmslusitania.info/lusitania/accommodations/saloon/

Everett, M. (1998). Wreck and Sinking of the Titanic. New Jersey, USA: Castle Books.

Goran, D. (2016, May 01). The interior of RMS mauretania – it was a floating palace and no expense was spared in its construction and internal design. Retrieved March 25, 2021, from https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/05/01/interior-rms-mauretania-floating-palace-no-expense-spared-construction-internal-design/

Goran, D. (2016, May 01). The interior of RMS mauretania – it was a floating palace and no expense was spared in its construction and internal design. Retrieved March 25, 2021, from https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/05/01/interior-rms-mauretania-floating-palace-no-expense-spared-construction-internal-design/

Milne, M. (Director). (2012). Titanic: The Aftermath [Video file]. Retrieved March 25, 2021, from https://www.primevideo.com/dp/amzn1.dv.gti.9eb73046-95b9-897d-7dc2-2b9ab55db911/ref=av_auth_return_redir?_encoding=UTF8&autoplay=1&ie=UTF8&redirect=true

Spignesi, S. J. (1998). The Complete Titanic: From the ship’s earliest blueprints to the epic film. Toronto, ON: Canadian Manda Group.

Swift, M. (2013). The Titanic: The memorabilia Collection. London, UK: Igloobooks.

Published by Monsieur Marketing

A place dedicated for the forgotten, where marketing analysis goes to the most iconic events of humanity for identifying best practices and learning outcomes to make a better business environment for all. Yours truly, Monsieur Marketing.

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